Archive for the ‘Interesting Facts’ Category

It’s an Education Fact: October 1, 2014

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

1) An EdTech survey found that 82% of readers feel their schools are doing at least somewhat well preparing students for needed college and career technical skills. 48% say teaching the rules of digital citizenship and responsible social networking is most important.

2) NYC is now spending $200 million on private schools for special education students, said by some to be sapping special education in mainstream schools and regular education too.

3) Nearly 6 million children–8% of the population–report having a disability.

4)  In 11 states, more than 20% of teachers rely on earnings from a second job. For instance, in Georgia, a 10-year veteran teacher with a graduate degree makes less than a flight attendant.

5) A University of Michigan poll on Children’s Health finds that 55% of the 2,017 surveyed adults said childhood obesity is the biggest problem in America; 52 said bullying is the second biggest.

6) School districts amass mountains of data annually but the National Center for Education Statistics estimate that less than 2% of them have “the capacity and resources” to make good use of it all.

7) A recent Gallup poll finds 57% of adults agree or strongly agree that online colleges and universities offer a high-quality education, up from 33% in 2012.

8) About 33% of our public schools do not have a full-time, state-certified librarian, constituting a national crisis.

Education-Related Facts: September 17, 2014

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

1) About 50,000 immigrant children are starting school; under federal law, they are entitled to a free public education regardless of immigrant status.

2) Finds Whiteboard Advisers, 72% of surveyed “key education influentials” agree that Congress won’t reauthorize the Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

3) According to an Education Next poll, 40% of teachers say they oppose the Common Core, three times more than in 2013; 53% of the public now approves of them.

4) Less than 25% of teachers surveyed by the Education Week Research Center say they are “prepared” or “well-prepared” to teach the Common Core Standards to English-language learners.

5) A recent survey of school superintendents found that about 50% of them want to reduce expulsions and out-of-school suspensions, but say, if they did, 72% would expect push back from teachers and 57% would expect that from principals.

 

Newsworth Education Facts: September 10, 2014

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

1. The New Teacher Project report also found that only 10% of the top 1/3 of college grads believe teaching offers a competitive salary.

2.  Last year, more than 73,000 international students enrolled in U.S. high schools.

3. According to the Center for Health Statistics, just 27% of 12- to 15-year-olds meet the recommended limit of 2 hours or less of TV and computer time per day. 7% watch 5 or more hours of TV a day, and 5% use a computer 5 or more hours per day.

4. As of now, white students are no longer the majority in our K-12 public schools. Latino students alone will make up 28% of our student population, finds the National Center for Education Statistics.

5. 56% of 7- to 11-year-olds use social media sites, getting around age restrictions.

6. A recent study finds that 18% of high school seniors smoked hookahs in the last year.

It’s an Education Fact: September 3, 2014

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

1. For the one in 8 children born to a mother without a high school diploma, 84% live in low-income families, just 16% read proficiently by 8th grade, 40% don’t graduate on time, and 27% are obese.

2. Nearly 40% of 18- to 24-year-old Americans believe they’re not good in math.

3. U.S. teachers put in 45 hours of work a week vs 38 on average in other countries, and 27 hours of instruction vs 19 hours. Still, 89% of our teachers say they’re satisfied with their jobs vs 91%.

4. Ironically, 74% of those with a bachelor’s degrees in STEM (Science, Math, Engineering, Math) subjects don’t work in STEM jobs.

5. Just 9.4% of 15-year-olds were able to answer the hardest questions on an international test of their financial knowledge and skills. More than one in 6 didn’t reach proficiency.

6. A New Teacher Project report finds that 90% of districts pay teachers based on years of experience and any advanced degrees they may hold regardless of performance. It also found that the average teacher makes $40,000 a year vs almost 50% more than someone in finance.

It’s an Education Fact: August 27, 2014

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

1. Four years ago, about 40 states were interested in the $370 million federally-funded online Common Core assessments. At least 17 have now backed away from them.

2.  Of the 35 waiver-monitoring reports reviewed by the U.S. Department of Education, 17 states are apparently not following through on fixing the bottom 5% priority” schools. Plus 17 other states are said not not be doing enough to help “focus” schools, and 9 are said to be failing to improve achievement in uncategorized schools.

3. According to the National Math + Science Initiative, only about 36% of high schoolers entering college are prepared for university-level math.

4. The NEA lost about 16,000 members in 2013-14, about 64,000 in 2012-13, and about 100,000 in 201l-12. Total membership now stands just under 3 million.

5. Nationally, schools lose between $1 billion and $2.2 billion a year in teacher attrition costs through moving or leaving the profession, says the Alliance for Excellent Education.

6. 70% of voters support a federal government plan to expand quality early childhood programs for low- and middle-income families.

7. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 13% of public school students receive special-education services. Of them 36% have “specific learning disabilities,” 22% have speech or language impairments, and 22% have autism, intellectual disabilities, a developmental delay, or multiple disabilities. Very few have hearing, vision, or motor issues alone.

Education-Related Facts: August 20, 2014

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

1.  Four years ago, about 40 states were interested in the $370 million federally-funded online Common Core assessments. At least 17 have now backed away from them.

2. Of the 35 waiver-monitoring reports reviewed by the U.S. Department of Education, 17 states are apparently not following through on fixing the bottom 5% priority” schools. Plus 17 other states are said not not be doing enough to help “focus” schools, and 9 are said to be failing to improve achievement in uncategorized schools.

3. According to the National Math + Science Initiative, only about 36% of high schoolers entering college are prepared for university-level math.

4. The NEA lost about 16,000 members in 2013-14, about 64,000 in 2012-13, and about 100,000 in 201l-12. Total membership now stands just under 3 million.

5. Nationally, schools lose between $1 billion and $2.2 billion a year in teacher attrition costs through moving or leaving the profession, says the Alliance for Excellent Education.

6. 70% of voters support a federal government plan to expand quality early childhood programs for low- and middle-income families.

7. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 13% of public school students receive special-education services. Of them 36% have “specific learning disabilities,” 22% have speech or language impairments, and 22% have autism, intellectual disabilities, a developmental delay, or multiple disabilities. Very few have hearing, vision, or motor issues alone.

8. For the one in 8 children born to a mother without a high school diploma, 84% live in low-income families, just 16% read proficiently by 8th grade, 40% don’t graduate on time, and 27% are obese.

9. Nearly 40% of 18- to 24-year-old Americans believe they’re not good in math.

10. U.S. teachers put in 45 hours of work a week vs 38 on average in other countries, and 27 hours of instruction vs 19 hours. Still, 89% of our teachers say they’re satisfied with their jobs vs 91%.

It’s an Education Fact: August 13, 2014

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

1) Lawmakers in 27 states have proposed either delaying or revoking the Common Core; 44 signed on originally.

2) According to a School Improvement Network survey, 62% of parents with school kids support the Common Core; 22% are opposed; and 17% had no opinion.

3) About 66% of superintendents believe the Common Core will improve the quality of education; 22% said they’ll have no effect, finds a recent Gallup poll.

4) About 60% of K-12 surveyed officials don’t feel that their schools have the bandwidth or the devices to make them ready for online testing.

5) In states that have already tried the Common Core assessments, as many as 70% of students failed, thus raising retention fears.

6) Four years ago, about 40 states were interested in the $370 million federally-funded online Common Core assessments. At least 17 have now backed away from them.

It’s an Education Fact: August 6, 2014

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

1. A recent Reading in Fundamental survey found that 83% of parents say it’s very or extremely important that children read in the summer, but just 17% say it’s the most important activity. 49% say #1 is playing outside. Also, 59% said their kids do the right amount of reading; 40% say they don’t.

2. 87% of high school seniors say they text every day; 61% use FaceBook daily, 51% us Instagram, and 35% use Twitter. Regular old phones came in at 34%. Pinterest came in at 16% and LinkedIn at 1%.

3. The University of Virginia found that kids in the “cool” category in middle school ended up as young adults using 40% more drugs and alcohol than the “not-so-cool” and were 23% likelier to run into trouble with the law.

4. In 2100-12, 81% of secondary schools used security cameras, and 57% had a police officer or security guard; 88% of public schools either lock and/or monitor doors.

5. 21 states allow community colleges to confer bachelor degrees and more such schools are dropping “community” from their names.

Education-Related Facts: July 30, 2014

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

1. About 82% of our public schools reported students enrolled in a dual-credit course in 2010-11; that’s 1.4 million students taking 2 million courses.

2.  Says MIT research: students remember only 10% of what they read, 20% of what they hear, 50% of what they see demonstrated–and 90% when actually doing something themselves in the virtual world.

3. More than 78% of teachers report using digital games in class, and 47% say low-performing students benefited the most. Only 15% said high-performers benefit. Plus, 30.8% use them to cover content mandated by standards, and 19.26% used them as motivators and rewards. 26.64% don’t use digital games.

4. In 1998, about 56% of children attended full-day kindergarten; now it’s 80%.

5. Some 50% of survey respondents strongly or somewhat agree that schools should be able to opt out of the new federal food standards for a year if they’ve incurred 6 months of financial loss because of them.

It’s an Education Fact: July 23, 2014

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

1. Findthebest.com finds that New York state spends the most per student with an average of $21,168, while Utah spends the least at $7,388.

2. According to FLN, 96% of respondents were familiar with the term “flipped learning,” up from 73% in 2012, and 75% of administrators support their teachers’ flipped classroom efforts.

3.  For low-income students who spent all 12 years in districts that increased spending by 20%, graduation rates rose by 23%, and those same kids were less likely as adults to fall into poverty.

4. According to the Education Week Research Center, about 70% of respondents agree that highly engaged and motivated students show excitement about learning, persistence, and lots of effort. Only 13%, though, believe high standardized test scores reflect motivation and engagement.

5. The average cost of a 4-year college has nearly tripled in the past 20 years to nearly $24,000 for tuition, fees, room and board.

6. Federal support for higher education went from $134 billion in 2010 to $150 billion in 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Education

7. America’s graduation rate now stands at 80%, with 4 states exceeding 90%: ND VT, WI, and NB.

It’s an Education Fact: July 16, 2014

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

1) Overall, teachers in the largest metropolitan areas were at school 94% of their scheduled hours–but 16% of them were chronically absent, missing 18 or more school days a year. Another 16% missed just 3 or fewer days.

2) A Gallup poll of about 1,900 superintendents found that 62% believe student performance should NOT be the most important factor in evaluating teachers vs. 34% who said it should.

3) A recent American Association of School Administrators found that 92.5% said the Common Core Standards are more rigorous than previous ones; 78% believe the education community supports the Common Core, bur only 51% said the public does.

4) 16 states have now mandated that controversial teacher evaluations be used in making tenure decisions, up from 10 in 2011.

5) It will cost $3.2 billion to equip and update public K-12 schools’ existing infrastructure and meet Obama’s goal of connecting 99% of students by 2018.

6) By 2020, there will be 1.4 million programming-related jobs but only about a quarter of available and qualified candidates to fill them, says Code.org.

It’s an Education Fact: July 9, 2014

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

1.  The U.S. has the second-highest level of child poverty among 35 economically advanced countries–23% vs. Finland’s 5.3%.

2.  Students and graduate students now owe more than $1 trillion in education loans, putting it right behind the housing debt.

3.  The federal National School Lunch Program serves 30 million K-12 students at a cost of $11 billion annually.

4.  A SmartBrief for Ed Tech survey found that 79.39% of readers believe it’s very important that schools address the needs of the whole child, everything from nutrition to physical education and emotional well-being; just 50.72% say their school/district does that “somewhat well.”

5.  The STEM Index found that American jobs requiring math or science knowledge increased from 12.8 million in 2000 to 16.8 million today, but high school students’ interest in those subjects is now below 2000 levels.

6.  According to the Pew Research Center, 33% of teens send over 100 text messages a day.

7.  The School Library Journal reports that U.S. schools spent about $73 million on e-books in 2012-13.

8.  According to the CDC, as of 2010, there’s been a 30% increase in the number of autism spectrum disorder diagnoses, with one in 68 children now affected vs one in 88 in 2008.

 

24) Black student enrollment has remained steady at 16% to 17%, but Hispanic enrollment is expected to hit 30% in the next decade.

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It’s an Educational Fact: July 2, 2014

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Data reveals

1) Charter schools receive an average of $3,509 less per students than those in traditional public schools.

2) Data reveals that by 8th grade, 48% of girls receive a mix of A’s and B’s compared to 31% of boys. Plus, boys account for 71% of all school suspensions. Also, almost 60% of college grads are women.

3) According to Common Sense Media, 76% of 9-year-olds read for pleasure once or more per week, down from 81% in 1984; about 33% of 13-year-olds and almost 50% of 17-year-olds report reading for pleasure less than twice a year.

4) A Penn State report finds that U.S. 4th grade teachers assign, on average, 19 minutes of math homework per night vs. 25 minutes in most other countries. Plus, 79% of U.S. 4th graders said their parents make sure they set aside homework time vs. 70% worldwide–but just 25% of Japanese students and 22% of South Korean parents do so.

5) According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the U.S. high school graduation rate is now at 80%.

6) The average age children start using touch screens is 11 months, and most used them for about 30 minutes per day. Meanwhile, it’s been found that playing non-educational games on them is linked to poor speech development.

7) A 2010 Indiana University High School Survey of Student Engagement found that 65% of students reported being bored “at least every day in class,” and 16% said they’re bored in every class.

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

1) 13 states do not belong to either the PARCC or SBAC Common Core testing consortia, considerably more than at the outset.

2) According to a Gates Foundation survey of 20,000 K-12 teachers, 73% said they’re “enthusiastic about implementing the Common Core, and 73% believe it is or will be a challenge doing so. Meanwhile, 51% said they don’t have enough collaboration time, and 43% said their classes are too big.

3) The same study found that 69% of the teachers feel they’re valued or heard at school, but only 5% feel that’s the case at the state level and just 2% at the national level.

4) By 2017, the NAEP tests–the nation’s report card– will be administered on tablets from private contractors, but 55% of teachers are not confident that this approach will provide a successful testing experience and results.

5) A recent survey finds that 42% of teachers and 38% of students feel the right amount of time is spent on testing.

It’s an Education Fact: 2/11/2014

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

1) In a survey of 1,000 principals in 14 states, 80% said they are prioritizing the new Common Core standards for school improvement in the belief they’ll provide students with deeper learning and ore meaningful assessments.

2) Three new polls find that just under 11% of respondents say their school or district is well-prepared to implement the Common Core; 25% say they’re somewhat prepared.

3) 74.74% of survey respondents in those surveys said their school/district spends too much time on test-prep; just 5.26% said more time should be spent.

4) A recent Common Sense Media survey of 800 adults said they were at least somewhat concerned about advertisers using students’ personal data to market to them, plus nearly 60% of parents said they’ve heard little or nothing about any of this.

5) In 1990, 28% of all births were to single mothers; in 2008, that figure stood at 40.6%, and that’s said to make it hard for them to support their kids let alone instill in them a work and education ethic.

6) In an ASCD SmartBrief poll, just 4% of readers agreed/strongly agreed that a longer school day and year will better prepare students for college and/or work success; about 46% said it will not.